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  • 20 Jun 2016 2:47 PM | Anonymous

    Authored By: Christon Valdivieso

    Edited By: Afton Knight


    As a proponent of challenging what we “know” to be true, last year I wrote about continuing education. Inevitably, I recently found myself at a loss for words when a professor challenged me. I mentioned the importance of forecasting and how forecasting error often leads to poor inventory management. The professor interrupted and began to tear down the notion of forecasting. I could not believe it. How could a professor not support forecasting? Considering the role of the supply chain, isn’t the forecast instrumental? The point our professor was challenging us to consider is while most companies use forecasting to align cross functional strategies, when it comes to inventory management, forecasting is part of a bigger issue.


    In Part 1 I talked about strategy and alignment; but, let’s not be naïve and pretend business is neat and simple. Tesla, for instance, had a strategic vision to generate cash flow in 2016; however, when orders for the Model 3 surged they pivoted to a time-to-market strategy. How can we as supply chain managers align inventory practices with business strategies that keep changing? We start by looking at the problems that distract us.


    Looking online, most articles about inventory management problems talk about the Big Five Distractions (Big Five):

    • Bad forecasting
    • Bad data
    • Communication
    • Personnel
    • Software

    The problem with the Big Five is that they place zero ownership on the inventory manager; and, that is the main problem with forecasting. Telling your boss, you cannot do your job because other people were wrong will not help you keep your job. The fact is, forecasting is almost always wrong. And If forecasting is always wrong, why do we blame others when inventory—aligned with the forecast—is off?


    This is what my professor was implying. Issues with forecasting and bad systems or data will always exist. Leaders have to take these issues into account and create solutions. As competition increases and profits get squeezed supply chain strategy is the next frontier for growing profitability. Thus, when it comes to inventory management, leaders have to be agile and creative.

    The inventory manager cannot hide behind systems, forecast, or people. In my experience there are two main causes of inventory issues: communication and poor decision making. I focus primarily on the latter—decision making.


    Poor decision making is generally a product of a lack of focus leading to costly or short sighted initiatives. With numerous supply chains and shifting business strategies loosing focus is easy, but it is not permanent. Take Target, after years of being a “fast follower” and coming in a distant third, Target recently decided to focus their efforts on an improved supply chain. This entailed re-coding its e-commerce platform to improve visibility and capacity. They also cracked down on vendors to increase supply chain reliability. Similarly, Ralph Lauren recently took steps to improve its profitability through reduced store foot prints and shipments.


    Each action is a practical step taken by the supply chain team to allow them to better react to demand, but first they had to accept ownership of the problem. Not only do the above instances illustrate the need to align the supply chain strategy with the business, they also show what can happen when we push beyond the Big Five Distractions. With all this in mind, I supply this thought: Are you or your forecast responsible for inventory decisions?


  • 27 May 2016 4:07 PM | Anonymous

    My good friend Taimur Matin has agreed to speak with us for our June Professional Development Meeting (PDM). He grew up in Pakistan and worked in Dubai for a number of years and has an international perspective that I think we all should be exposed to. The June PDM will be small so sign up early. Check out a brief bio on Taimur below:


    Taimur Matin has spent the last 5 years working with APL in Dubai, UAE on international trade. Specializing in containerization and ocean freight, Taimur, has unique knowledge dealing with customs, INCOTERMS, commodities, and international relations. Taimur took a break for international shipping to complete his Master of Science in Global Logistics/Supply Chain from Arizona State University.


    Taimur will give his presentation on international trade and commodities including process for international trade, how companies can ensure profitability and reduce risk, and how the commodities market effects both the macro and local economy. Join us for a great discussion on June 16th as we take a deeper look into what it takes to successfully manage an international supply chain.




  • 15 May 2016 10:11 PM | Anonymous

    Authored By: Christon Valdivieso

    Edited By: Afton Knight


               During my professional career, I have had the opportunity to work with various different inventory management systems and strategies and it is likely you have or will too. The primary focus of an inventory manager seems simple on paper: control raw materials, work-in-progress (WIP), and finished goods. The complexity arises from understanding how and when to balance lean (pull) strategies against slack (push) strategies.

    Everyone in their various positions that you deal with will undoubtedly have the “correct” answer for you, but as Deming[i] tells us, “knowledge depends on theory” and “information is not knowledge.” Thus, it is important to understand how (and why) one should arrive at a certain inventory management solution.

    Lean strategies

    When I first started as an inventory manager, I had no idea what I was doing. Demand was seasonal, variable, and emotionally driven. Furthermore, my inventory sustained a quick rate of obsolescence. To make matters worse I had limited data to support strategic decisions and POS data was unreliable and rarely mirrored data from the floor. Needless to say the inventory management process was time consuming and arduous. I adapted a Just-In-Time (JIT) strategy for my category A inventory items and maintained low safety stock to reduce holding and obsolescence costs. Substitutes were easily sold during periods of stock outs, making stock out costs low. Demand for category B and C goods were mainly dependent, thus correct A item planning captured the majority of issues.

    Slack Strategies

    When I moved to the next company, the pattern was different and I had a steep learning curve. Demand was less seasonal yet significantly more variable. Stock out costs were very high and I had a rude awakening when I attempted to implement my lean strategies of JIT and low safety stock levels. I had to increase my safety stock levels, use my sales data to determine peak periods to ensure coverage and high customer service levels (CSL), and train my team to ensure product availability. Thankfully, we had a fully integrated system that collected accurate sales data in real time and increased inventory visibility.

    Even though I adapted my strategies, I still did not understand the theory behind my decisions. My actions were reactionary at best. So what do you do when you decide it is time to be proactive?

    The simple answer is to seek alignment. The supply chain and its practices must be aligned with the business strategy. A Quality Digest[ii] article recently pointed out that a common mistake is maintaining a narrow focus on performance (more on this in Part 3), but I would take it further to say there is too narrow a focus on the supply chain. Remember:

                 “optimization of the parts does not optimize the whole.” -Deming

    Take a look at your company and the market space it operates in. Where is its success derived? Consider these elements and how they relate to your company.

    ·        Does your company focus on being responsive or having inventory available?

    ·        What are your company’s CSL KPIs?

    ·        What is your voice of the customer (VOC) research telling you is important from your customer’s prospective?

    There are various other questions, but these will capture a large portion of your inventory design needs.

    Responsive or Available?

                   Like it or not Amazon is changing the game for everyone, but not always in the same way. For many retail and B2C companies, availability is the name of the game. If your supply chain cannot have product in the right place at the right time, you lose a customer. Do it twice and you’ve lost that customer, and some of their friends, for life. For some companies, mainly B2B, the emphasis is on delivering product on schedule after receiving an order. Understanding which one of these you are is your first step. Yes, this one is simple but common knowledge is not always common. Additionally, many companies are actually responsive but use safety stock to sell themselves as available. How your company behaves and how they see themselves will often lead to frustration as you plan your lean/slack strategies.

    CSL KPIs

                   If this section’s heading does not make sense to you, it is important to do some research because the concept is integral to monitoring your supply chain’s alignment strategy. Customer Service Levels (CSLs) and how they are measured (KPIs) will drive structure. CSL refers to how often customers receive complete, accurate, and on time order deliveries. This is the part that causes rush orders, upset salespeople, and “unpleasant” emails. While most companies have some way of interpreting their CSL, they will not always have a clear measurement of it. If there is a mismatch in your responsive/available value proposition, you will be faced with an unclear and misunderstood CSL. Your CSL (measured in percent orders) will be a balance between the cost of not getting your customers’ orders correct and the cost to do so every time. While it can be cost prohibitive to seek a 100% CSL, in instances like successfully landing a plane, it is impossible not to.

    VOC

                   The voice of the customer—their needs, wants, and feedback—is so critical it is a wonder how it is missed. I have seen sales people so focused on what they need to close a deal that they miss what the customer is actually saying. Even more often, I have seen salespeople make promises the operations team cannot deliver (or did not know they needed to deliver). Therefore, it is integral that processes and relationships are in place to ensure that the VOC is communicated with the inventory manager. Having a supply chain that is integrates and aligns departments throughout the company will begin to break down barriers and open up communication between necessary parties. Part 3 will have more on the customer relationship management (CRM) processes that will facilitate VOC communication.

                   Understanding the VOC, CSL, and nature of your company are the keys to understanding the theory behind your lean/slack inventory decisions. If you have not yet taken a minute to look at these, I supply this thought: Is your inventory management strategy reactive or proactive?



    [i] http://www.maaw.info/DemingExhibit.htm

    [ii] http://www.qualitydigest.com/inside/quality-insider-article/ten-common-inventory-mistakes-and-how-avoid-them.html


  • 02 May 2016 11:20 AM | Anonymous

    Authored By: Christon Valdivieso

    Edited By: Afton Knight


    If you have not heard about the gig economy, welcome to the 21st century. I have heard it used interchangeable with the “Uber Economy” but I will not give Uber all the credit. In fact, according to a NY Times article[i]the gig economy has been building for some time. The shift to less traditional employment (including freelance, contract labor, and temping) saw a spike during the 2009 downturn. Today it is not uncommon to find an Uber driver that has a house or room on Airbnb. As Amazon continuous its quest for world domination (or at least a sustainable logistics program), we will no doubt see more resumes with ‘Amazon Delivery Consultant’. In the past, HR managers have frowned about multiple jobs on resumes, but as the Gig Economy continues, multiple jobs during short periods of time will be the norm.

    If you haven’t heard of Talent Supply Chain Management (TSCM)[ii]…welcome to 2016. TSCM focuses on treating talent pipelines like the supply of product. Just as companies have yearly strategic planning meeting involving suppliers, they should have strategic meetings involving talent. Consider how ludicrous it would be for a company to plan its marketing or distribution goals after a need presented itself. Yet this is what most companies do with talent.

    This is where the two concepts intersect. What most companies are headed towards is a mixture of traditional full time employment and flex labor. These flex labor roles represent up to 30% of projected labor which means there is a huge potential for those who want to be their own boss. Similarly, there is a huge potential for people looking to gain exposure and experience in various facets of a company. The key will be creating value through quality versus quantity “gigs”.

    Have a need for on call fulfillment/customer service/delivery drivers? Why not make the on call lead a temporary or flex position too? Generally, front line hourly associate roles are dissected to create various FTE (Full Time Equivalent) needs. Unfortunately, this creates a knowledge and talent utilization gap. Many associates are not afforded the opportunity to move up due to long term full timers that are already in line for a select few leadership roles. Most companies combat this by aggressively growing the company’s footprint. Making the leadership roles flexible (i.e. part-time, contract, or rotational) allows companies to add the societal benefit of employing and training more locals while allowing them to interview and select proven top performers.

    Whether your role in the supply chain handles distribution, logistics, procurement, or any number of roles along the value chain this gig workforce cannot be ignored. At the same time, it has to be managed correctly. A major element of the gig economy is the sharing of ideas and information. Adopting a turn-and-burn mentality will tarnish your company’s reputation. Aligning your gig workforce with values that are shared between your company and workers will further uphold the brand.

    With that in mind I supply this thought: What is your value proposition, more importantly, how can you leverage the Gig Economy to meet your professional goals?



    [i] Scheiber, Noam; “Growth in the ‘Gig Economy’ Fuels Work Force Anxieties”; The New York Times; online; http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/13/business/rising-economic-insecurity-tied-to-decades-long-trend-in-employment-practices.html?_r=2

    [ii] Carroll, Teresa; Kelly Outsourcing & Consulting Group; online; http://www.kellyocg.com/uploadedFiles/7-KellyOCG/2-Knowledge/Talent_Supply_Chain/Talent_Supply_Chain_Management_Readiness.pdf


  • 20 Apr 2016 4:30 PM | Anonymous

    Authored By: Christon Valdivieso

    Edited By: Afton Knight


         The APICS Dictionary defines supply chain resilience as “the ability of a supply chain to anticipate…avoid or mitigate, and/or recover from disruptions to supply chain functionality”. Supply chain disruptions are more than just the daily annoyances from a late truck or an interrupted production schedule. According to new research, supply chain disruptions cost companies millions of dollars every year[i]. A single disruption can cost anywhere from US$100,000 to US$1 million[ii] and most of them are preventable! The two major tools for creating resilience are redundancy and flexibility. I should note here that I prefer the concept of agility (mental nimbleness) to flexibility (mental yoga) as agility implies the ability to see and maneuver into different ways to achieve success. Flexibility, on the other hand, implies an ability to fit success into a changing picture. Think of it like this: a flexible supply chain manager might keep their staff late to finish a project whereas an agile supply chain manager cuts non-essential associates incurring less OT to finish the task. While a flexible leader argues the glass is half full, the agile leader puts the same amount of water into a smaller glass and fills it up. For this discussion let’s focus on redundancy (i.e. repetition or having multiple of the same thing).

    Redundancy is a great way to protect your operation from disruptions. The most common types of redundancy are safety stock and utilizing multiple suppliers. Given that the U.S. Census Bureau[iii] reports a yearly growth of retail inventories of 5.5% (1.6% overall) for November 15, I would propose that most supply chain managers understand the need for safety stock. They will, no doubt, come under fire from their “lean” minded senior leadership, but will supply chains be reactive and cut safety stock or find an appropriate balance? Also, what about multiple suppliers?

    Most businesses achieve scale by leveraging larger business needs for lower costs. Thus, a reduction in suppliers is useful; however, there is a risk of increased disruption susceptibility (I would like to note that risk management is a key factor in all this as well, but I will save that discussion for another day). Recently, Toyota revealed[iv] a shutdown of its Japan operations for a week due to a supplier-related issue. Strikes at the port of LA/Long Beach and New York[v] have impacted almost every US business. Many companies decided to utilize the New York port after the LA strike, but New York’s recent strike illustrates the need to innovate multiple supply chain solutions. Is air freight a potential secondary option? Can a 3PL help open your supply chain? Is there a free app for improved inventory management? Can the top two bids be utilized to reduce procurement risks? Most of these question shouldn’t be new, but the answers might be.

    And so, I supply this thought: How resilient is your supply chain and has it been tested?

     



    [i] Hanna, Sheree; “Research reveals supply chain disruption cost UK manufacturers 58 million”; Supply Chain Digital; Online; http://www.supplychaindigital.com/procurement/32/Research-Reveals-Supply-Chain-Disruption-Cost-UK-Manufacturers-58-million

     

    [ii] Christ, Andrea; “Costly Supply Chain Disruptions”; insurancenewsnet.com; online; http://insurancenewsnet.com/oarticle/COSTLY-SUPPLY-CHAIN-DISRUPTIONS-a-516674

     

    [iv]Horie, Masatugu; “Toyota Supplier Behind Production Shutdown Pulls Forecasts”; Bloomberg; online; http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-02-03/toyota-supplier-behind-production-shutdown-pulls-profit-forecast

     

    [v] Online; “NRF: Strikes at East, Gulf Coast Ports Not the Way to go”; World Maritime News; https://worldmaritimenews.com/archives/182169/nrf-strikes-at-east-gulf-coast-ports-not-the-way-to-go/

     


  • 29 Dec 2015 10:30 PM | Anonymous

    The Phoenix APICS chapter completed a custom Principles workshop at Interface Products in Scottsdale, Arizona. These workshops included operations and materials planning, MRP and inventory management. These workshops were 8 sessions (3 hours in duration) which included education, training and practical applications. The following is a testimonial to the effectiveness of these workshops.


    This is feedback from Scott Dunne our host at Interface Products.


    The Principles Workshops at Interface provided a great deal of relevant background and detail on MRP terms and how the computer "thinks". Our people saw meaning in the types of production concepts and how they may relate to Interface's operations. People who have worked here for years finally understood the mechanics behind the MRP messages they work on every day.

    Indeed, having the class on-site provided a sense of team and many insights were shared on how things work and WHY...

  • 27 May 2014 8:16 PM | Deleted user
    Take it from me, I know that you hear a lot of overblown hype about social media and hypothetical futures revolving around social media that never take a hold.  And I know that if you are a working professional, you are probably on LinkedIn, and maybe on facebook, and maybe one or two other platforms, and you also may feel that that is quite enough as it is.  So you may be wary of a social media nut like me telling you that you need yet another profile.  But stick with me as I explain the required effort is minimal and the benefits are great.  

    Job search

    When looking for a new job, there are many different approaches and tactics. Many tactics are important no matter what your overarching job search strategy is, like getting your LinkedIn profile updated and looking good and sharpening your resume.  But Twitter provides a unique way to identify potential jobs which is one of the most tedious aspects of job search.  Job boards are limited to the specific companies, recruiters and managers that use them.  Thus, to see every job, one would have to be on every job board.  Twitter, on the other hand, can be used as a universal search tool to see postings that you might not see in the job boards that you use.  So I'm not advocating to use Twitter as your only job search tool, or even your primary one, but in conjunction with traditional job boards.  There are certain Twitter users that are dedicated to propagating job postings in a specific field, like supply chain management.  When you find such an accounts that fit your specific field and/or locale, follow them so that their posts will show up on your home feed.  Then you can scan your home feed when you have a moment and get immediate results.  Here's how to get started: once you have created your account, use the Twitter search bar and type this in to see supply chain jobs: 

         #supplychain #job


    Note that this brings up different results than using Google to search for the same term; the search algorithms are very different.  The results on Twitter will point you to a multitude of job postings and accounts that you may want to follow.  You can also try variations of this, like for #operationsmanagement or for #logistics.  Depending on if you are casually looking for jobs or are more seriously in need of a new job, you may want to consider setting up an account with a social media manager like Hootsuite.  With Hootsuite and similar social media managers, you can set up streams that contain the searches that you find work best for you.  That way you can scan multiple feeds very quickly.  

    News

    There are many places to get news, but I find that Twitter is a great way to get the stories I'm most interested in.  And unlike subscribing to a specific website or daily email, Twitter news stories show up as they are posted and each post could be from a different source in rapid succession.  Much like using the search function for job search, you can also use specific searches to get news about specific topics of interest.  When you find accounts that seem to have a lot of valuable posts, you can then follow them.  


    Deals and Opportunities
    There are certain deals and opportunities that are only offered on social media platforms, so you have to be watchful of the companies, organizations, celebrities and brands that you admire or strive to interact with.  For example, I had the chance to go behind-the-scenes for a SpaceX rocket launch with NASA last year, primarily because I saw a NASA post about on Twitter and applied; I was selected because I am engaged on social media and have my own blog, but I would have never even known of that opportunity had I not been following NASA and reading posts on Twitter that fateful day.  So many of the people I met are now great contacts to follow on facebook and Twitter, and keep me updated in the world of space travel, which I was barely an observer of before that trip.  It was an amazing opportunity, and it is only open to people who tweet.  

    Getting Help

    There are people, especially celebrities or experts in very niche fields of interest, who cannot be reached easily by phone or email.  But they can be found tweeting, and will respond to tweets they are mentioned in.  Maybe not every tweet, but tweets they find worthy.  I was trying to help a startup launch in the arena of medical marijuana vapors, and in brainstorming marketing campaign ideas, someone mentioned how it would just be fantastic if Cheech and Chong would promote it.  One tweet from them would make a world of difference for this startup!  So I took a chance, and wrote a tweet briefly explaining what we were doing, and mentioned their Twitter handle.  They didn't respond right away, but one day I checked my alerts and found that they were FOLLOWING me!  They don't follow many people, so for them to follow me was a huge achievement, and I knew I'd be able to use that to my advantage when the time was right.  But you don't always have to target a specific person; you can also ask for help on a specific brand of product or general questions.  People who are searching for that topic will see your tweet and lend you their 140-characters of advice.  I've gotten advice on how to get good sound while shooting basic video on a standard digital camera, what mics are the best to use, what software to edit it with, etc.  I also had one person refer me to someone else who would actually meet up with me and show me how to use the laser cutter at a public workspace, all arranged through Twitter.

    Seeing What Others Don't

    Twitter isn't just about blasting today's news over and over again; it's also very personal.  People tweet about what they're up to, and if those people happen to be doing interesting things, then you get to be a part of that journey.  I like to follow the astronauts at the International Space Station; some of them post pictures of the supply rockets as the approach, with a part of Earth in the background, or the sun setting over an exotic part of the world and the light catches it just so, or selfies of them inside the return vehicle as they prepare for their descent back to Earth.  You just don't see that stuff on the front page of Yahoo! or your favorite news journal, and every day, sometimes every hour, is something new!  


    Getting Recognized

    When I went to Disneyland for the first time since I was a little girl, I couldn't help but tweet about it.  And Disneyland tweeted back!  Who doesn't want to be personally welcomed by such a big, public entity?  It was a simple, warm greeting, but it added to the magic of being there for the first time as an adult, and it kind of made me feel like a kid again.  Companies are trying to engage their customers all the time, both to fix what has gone wrong and to celebrate a happy customer.  It's a great way to get problems fixed, or at least acknowledged, which is what a lot of us want when something goes wrong.  It's also fun when a company thanks you or gives you kudos for something you said or achieved.  

    Learning to be Concise

    I take this one to heart, my friends!  I have known for a very long time that I am a wordy writer.  And for that reason, I resisted Twitter for a long time.  But there really truly is an art to being concise - by limiting us to 140 characters, a new language has evolved which is more efficient and less clunky than ever before.  In fact, I recommend using less than the 140 characters, because I want my people to RT my posts, or re-tweet in long hand, and they need so many characters to give me credit or they will have to cut something out.  There is a time and place for articles, and there is a time and place for headlines, quick thoughts, shout outs, and short blurbs.  Having to post on Twitter regularly means honing the ability to get to the point, be exciting, and entice readers to click.  That is truly a greater art than writing a novel, in my opinion.  

    Find Out What's Going on Right Now at This Event

    When people post updates about a specific event as its happening, that is known as Live Tweeting.  If you're attending, say, the APICS 2014 International Conference, or some other large event with like-minded people, there are bound to be live tweeters.  By following an event's hashtag, those live tweeters become secondary eyes and ears to point you to the most interesting presentations, tours, quotes, speakers, etc. 


    Let's Get Started

    Hopefully by now I have convinced you that it is worthwhile to (a) create (yet another) account, (b) invest time in researching and using Twitter as a tool, and (c) commit to using it regularly to enhance your job search, news awareness, know-how, or personal experience.  I never want to leave anyone hanging with a compelling reason to do something but no first steps.  Here's my recommendation to get started:

    (1) Go to Twitter.com and create a user name that is meaningful to you.  This is called your Twitter "handle".  
    (2) Folllow the steps Twitter mandates of you (yes, they too want your experience to be of value, so they kind of force feed you into certain steps).
    (3) When you've completed the Twitter mandated steps, look for some or all of these Twitter handles and follow them if you like them: 
         @BusinessInsider
         @guykawasaki
         @APICSPhoenix
         @Phoenixtoday
         @CNN
         @Cmdr_Hadfield
         @Inc
         @Cerasis
         @FastCompany
    (4) Add a profile picture - it doesn't have to be super professional, but don't make it too lame either.  Just something that says, this is me, I'm on Twitter now.  
    (5) Write your first tweet.  It can be your favorite quote (if its not too long), or a picture of something interesting you saw last week, or a link to an interesting article or video that you want to share - the important thing is to add your own spin on it.  
    (6) Post something new every day for about a week or two.  When you see something you like in your Home Feed, retweet it or quote it and add what you like about it.  Reply to others' tweets when you have something to add to the conversation.  
    (7) Search for topics of interest, and see who is posting valuable content on those topics.  Follow those people / accounts.  Remember to use hashtags (#) for key words.
    (8) If you have a SmartPhone, download the Twitter app and sign in to it.  Use that when you're in line at a store or restaurant, or at the doctor's office waiting to be called, etc.  Whenever you have a minute, you can scan your home feed and post at will.  
    (9) Reply to at least one celebrity's post, even if its a "Wow, that's awesome!" or "Thanks for posting!" or "Congrats!"
    (10) Tweet about a company or brand that you like, tell the world why they are great.
    (11) Tweet to me if you'd like, @APICSPhoenix or @Lowa84, and ask me how you're doing.  

  • 19 May 2014 8:53 PM | Deleted user
    Every year, APICS Phoenix dedicates one dinner meeting to the executives and senior managers of our companies and leaders in our field, and present our annual awards. 

    This year's Senior Management Night featured Subba Nishtala  as the speaker.  We had a large number of first-time PDM attendees, including several of our invited managers. There were also a couple recent graduates who attended the PDM, and we are always happy to see students and college grads among our PDM attendees.

    Subba led us through a discussion on engagement between functional work groups.  Specifically, in order for IT to provide a satisfactory solution, they must engage and be engaged with the internal customer they are providing it to.  Likewise, is a specific function, like purchasing, needs an IT solution, they must engage their IT counterparts to work together on the best possible solution.  It is not about assigning projects or specifying solutions and demanding adherence, it is about adding value so that the important players get a seat at the table.  While the conversation was focused around supply chain and IT, the principles we discussed could be applied to any pairing of traditionally silo'd departments.  

    Kicking off our annual awards presentation, the Company of the Year went to Coco-Cola.  We have had a number of in-house classes this year at Coco-Cola, and their support for APICS and the Body of Knowledge made them a clear candidate for the award. 

    Member of the Year was awarded, to my surprise, to yours truly, Laura Winger.  I am very grateful for the recognition and everything that APICS Phoenix has done for me, and honored to receive the award this year.   

    Thank you to everyone who invited their managers, brought guests and attended the event!  We look forward to seeing you at the next PDM in August!

    Visit our facebook page to see all the photos!
  • 13 Apr 2014 1:08 PM | Deleted user
    I first learned about TechShop several years ago when it was just a place in the San Francisco area.  But the idea intrigued me: dozens of high-end, expensive machines for fabrication available for use by the general public for a minimal monthly membership fee (much like a gym membership model).  Tinkerers, inventors, wanna-be entrepreneurs, students, small businesses, and even large manufacturing companies all could utilize the unique capabilities and inspiring environment of TechShop.  So when I heard that there was a TechShop opening in near me, it would be an understatement to say that I was excited.  

    APICS Phoenix got a chance to tour this brand-new TechShop facility in Chandler, Arizona for our April PDM.  The tour started with the most popular machines - the laser cutters.  These Scottsdale-made powerhouses can make precision cuts and etches in a variety of materials, and were used to etch the APICS Phoenix logo into dogtags for each of our attendees.  Other examples of laser cut and etched products were displayed outside the computer classroom.  All the computers at TechShop are loaded with Autodesk software, which is generally too pricey for most individuals to afford.  

    Our next stop was a favorite at our previous tour at Local Motors, the 3D printers.  Known as rapid prototyping tools, 3D printers empower members to create custom parts without molds or finished plastic products.  Also known as additive manufacturing tools, 3D printers add plastic or other materials layer by layer, guided by 3D models designed on the computer.  

    "Something for everything," our tour guide said as we ventured over to the sewing area.  Front and center is the massive CNC embroidery machine.  Around the room are various industrial sewing machines as well as a tools for cutting vinyl and screenprinting.  

    Further into the workspace is an electronics section, which happened to have some small robots there a recent workshop.  Then we peered into the woodshop, which has everything you need to form and work with wood, including lathes and table routers.  

    The smell of Dickey's Barbecue being set up beckoned to us, but we pressed on, into some of the more heavy duty areas.  There are areas for TIG and MIG welding, and powder coating, as well as many tools for metal working.  Outside is perhaps the most impressive machine, the CNC waterjet.  Keeping guard over the waterjet is a giant wooden T-rex model that was made by a TechShop Dream Consultant.  

    We headed inside to grab our dinner that was now set up by Dickey's Barbecue, while the CNC waterjet was getting set up for a demonstration.  When it was ready, we got to see the power of this machine, as it cut and etched stainless steel right before our eyes. 


    If you are interested in a Corporate Membership with TechShop through APICS Phoenix, please contact Laura Winger at mktg@APICSPhoenix.org.  

    Thank you to Dickey's Barbecue Pit and TechShop and all of our attendees for making this inspiring event happen!


  • 21 Mar 2014 12:04 PM | Deleted user
    APICS Phoenix visited the Local Motors microfactory on March 20th, and attendees got to see, some of them for the first time, disruptive technologies and business models abundant within Local Motors.  It's flagship vehicle, the Rally Fighter, was designed not by Local Motors R&D engineers huddled in a room, but by worldwide crowdsourcing contests.  Winning designers are financially rewarded, either with a lump sum upfront or with incremental payments as each product bearing their design is sold.  Winning designers are also recognized on the product itself.  For example, each Rally Fighter bears a small plate with the name of the person whose sketch of the body became the overall design of the car.  

    Our tour guide, Tony, walked us through the assembly area where motor cycles and Rally Fighters were built.  You can't buy a new Rally Fighter off a lot; buyers participate in the manufacturing and assembly of their own vehicles. 

    Among one of the most awe-inspiring gadgets were the many 3D printers that were running.  The MakerBot Replicator 2 is one of the most popular 3D printer model.  The ones at Local Motors were literally printing parts that would be used on the Rally Fighter, as well as protective cases for the tiny quadcopters they sell in The Shop.   

    Another innovative technology we learned about was their live, on-screen work instructions displayed on iPads that could be mounted on or near the unit being assembled.  If there is an error on the work instructions, mechanics can update the work instructions, which then gets routed to the creator for approval.  Those work instructions are also available on the web, so anyone working on their unit at home can see how to repair or put something back together, or provide improvements from their experience.  

    The service area of the microfactory was very small, mainly because, as Tony pointed out, when you build your own vehicle, you know how to fix it.  Many of the components used in the Rally Fighter are off-the-shelf products from large OEMs, so that they "don't have to reinvent the wheel."  The engines and transmissions carry warranties from the car manufacturers they come from, so you could take your Rally Fighter into a dealership repair shop for, say, if your engine needs maintenance or repair.  

    Our next stop was the inventory racks, which are right next to the assembly floors.  Local Motors assemblers pick their own components, so the inventory racks are organized based on the assembly timeline; what you need for day 1, and 2, etc. of assembly.  Procurement is based on a tightly-controlled min/max system.  

    Through a set of hinged panels we came to an area where more of the fabrication is done.  A CNC waterjet and a CNC laser cutter were among the impressive pieces of equipment.  All of the designs are open to the public, Tony explained, so you can build your own Rally Fighter at home, if you wanted, "but good luck!"  

    As the tour came to a close, we got to see the construction of a new wing of Local Motors, a workspace for inventors and tinkerers to bring their projects and utilize the tools and knowhow of other experts.  

    Local Motors is much more than a car manufacturer, although the cars they make are pretty awesome.  They are a big part of the Maker movement, one of the prime examples of crowdsourcing product design and collaborative manufacturing projects, focusing on small-run, niche requirements instead of large, mass assembly manufacturing sites.  "GM knows how to make thousands and thousands of cars, but they don't know how to make just a thousand." 



    3D printers like the MakerBot Replicator 2, as well as CNC machines and other rapid fabrication tools like the ones seen at Local Motors, can also be seen at our next tour in April at TechShop.  There, you can take classes on everything from how to use the machines, how to design products in AutoDesk Inventor CAD and CAM programs, and much more. 

    If you attended, please take our survey here.
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